Happy New Year for 2019

Wishing you all a happy new year and a very healthy, prosperous and blessed 2019. Thank you, my friends, for your visits, your comments, your presence here on Leisure Lane. You have made this past year a blessing, and I am looking forward to many more delightful visits with you while sharing more wonderful things with you in the coming year.

Until next time, may happy days abound!

Marianne

Note: The above image is by Marianne Coyne 2018.

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Vintage Hankies Jigsaw Puzzle

Good day, my friends! Welcome to Leisure Lane. I hope you are all doing well today. Yesterday, we had our first day of sunshine since the end of January, so that was very nice, indeed!

I just love pretty things, especially vintage. And I have a special place in my soul for vintage hankies and kitchen linens.  You may remember the above photo from a past post. I had found the lovely crocheted pouch in a nearby thrift store – perfect condition – and perfect for storing my dear mother’s vintage hankies. This lovely photo is now available as a jigsaw puzzle… the lovely crocheted pouch with the hankies spilling against one of my watercolor border doodles. It simply makes me smile and I hope it does you, as well. I’m hoping to also offer more floral jigsaw puzzles in the future.

Thank you for strolling by and visiting. May your day be full of color and cheer, and…

Until next time, may happy days abound!

Marianne

 

You Can Write a Book Review: 5 Tips To Show You How

Good day, friends…I hope you are all having a wonderful day.  Since I’m recuperating from a cold, I decided to share something old, but still pertinent. For those of you who love to read, but are shy about writing a review, this may be helpful. I wrote the following article for LinkedIn last January and thought to post it here on the blog.  I hope you enjoy it.

open book with script

 

You Can Write a Book Review: 5 Tips to Show You How

You just finished reading a book – now what? Book reviews are an essential form of word-of-mouth advertising for the author, especially if the review is a good one. They also help other readers to decide whether or not a book is worth the investment of their time and money. But the majority of readers will end up never leaving a review. Though the reasons may vary, I have discovered two major ones: the reader doesn’t know how to express his/her thoughts in writing and they’re afraid to try, or they don’t want to spend the time.

Writing a book review doesn’t have to be complicated or time consuming, and doesn’t have to sound like it was written by the editor of Swank ‘n Stuff Publishers. It just has to be honest and brief. Here are 5 tips on how to write a book review, which will benefit both the author and readers.

1. HONESTY IS THE BEST POLICY

It’s important to be honest when writing a review. Gushing over a book that you really didn’t care for isn’t helpful to the author or other readers. The whole purpose of a review is to express your true opinions about what you read. Whether you loved the book or not, state your opinion honesty and kindly, and give a reason or two to back up your viewpoint. For example: “I didn’t enjoy this book because there were too many misspelled words, which distracted me from the story. I hope the author will remedy this.”

2. BE BRIEF

Many readers won’t leave a review because they don’t consider themselves writers in the traditional sense, and they feel intimidated by publicly expressing their opinions. Or, and this is the worst reason, they don’t want to spend the time. Your review doesn’t have to be a dissertation. Keeping it brief and to the point, alleviates the anxiety associated with novice review writing, and it doesn’t take more than a minute or two of your time. It’s sufficient to simply state that you liked the book and give a few reasons why. For example: “I enjoyed reading this book because the humor with which it was written kept me wanting more,” or “I found this book to be funny and engaging. I especially related to the author’s frustration with a houseful of cats. I will definitely recommend this book to my pet-loving family and friends.” – Simple, honest, and brief.

3. SPOILER ALERT

When writing a review, it’s important not to give away too much of the story.
Keeping your review general, gives the next reader a chance to use their imagination. Using an excerpt or two from the book is fine in getting your point across, for example: “ ‘Josephine held her daughter in her arms. She pulled Mary as close to her as she could, as if she were holding her for the first time, but she knew in her heart it would be the last. She had to let her go.’ I loved the way the characters allowed me to feel their emotions.” The person reading a review wants to be intrigued by the information you give, but doesn’t want to hear too many details. Why would they want to read the story if they already know what happens? Don’t milk the cow dry – leave something for the next reader.

4. BE CONSTRUCTIVE – NOT DESTRUCTIVE

If for any reason you didn’t like the book you read, it’s imperative to be constructive and kind in your review. Raking the author over the coals is not only cruel, but doesn’t give the author a chance to improve. Be honest with the reasons you didn’t like the book, but also give ways in which you think the author could improve this particular book and his/her future ones. And if there is a saving grace about the book – something that you did like about it – don’t forget to mention it in your review.

5. IT’S NOW OR NEVER

As I said in the beginning, word-of-mouth is an essential form of advertising for an author. So the best time to write a review is immediately after finishing the book, when the characters and your emotive response are fresh on your mind and ready to be shared. The longer you postpone writing a review, there’s a greater chance you will never write it. While you’re still in the mood of what you’ve read, give it a go and let everyone know.

Don’t be shy. Writing a review is not as difficult as you might think, and you’ll feel good about being part of the wonderful literary experience. And who knows…one day you might even be inspired to write a book of your own.

Until next time, may happy days abound!

Marianne

Note: This article originally appeared on LinkedIn, January 16, 2016

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